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General => Ulti Strategy => Topic started by: Diaphanous on June 08, 2013, 05:26:12 AM



Title: When is the pivot established?
Post by: Diaphanous on June 08, 2013, 05:26:12 AM
Hello everybody, I have a technical question.

I've seen discussions about changing your pivot foot after it has been established, but when is the pivot established?

According to UPA rules:

"Pivot: The particular part of the body in continuous contact with a single spot on the field during a thrower's possession once the thrower has come to a stop or has attempted a throw or fake. When there is a definitive spot for putting the disc into play, the part of the body in contact with that spot is the pivot."

Unfortunately this definition if a little bit vague.

Just imagine the following situation:
A player gains possession of the disc with both feet planted on the ground, and a mark begins the stall with a hard forehand force (for a righty). The player holding the disc fakes a right forehand without moving either of his feet. He then switches the disc to his left hand, steps out with his left foot, and throws a lefty flick around the mark.
Is this legal?

According to the rules, the pivot is established after the first fake - but if neither foot has left the ground, which foot is considered the pivot?

It seems to me that the establishment of the pivot occurs once all but one body part has lost contact with the ground, at which point the body part still in contact with the ground is the pivot. That is to say, if I throw a fake without having moved either feet since gaining possession of the disc, then I should be able to established either foot as the pivot after the throw.


Title: Re: When is the pivot established?
Post by: Seppo on June 09, 2013, 09:34:18 PM
Hey Diaphanous,

First off, welcome to UT!  :)

You pose a good question.  In the scenario you've described, either foot can become the pivot.  In fact, I've seen this play a few times.  Righty picks up the disc with both feet on the ground, defender things their left foot is the pivot and then ... BOOM ... thrower executes a play with their right foot as the pivot (which gives them extra reach).  Perfectly legal.  A bit awkward for a righty to throw with a right pivot, but possible.  Very sneaky...

Doesn't really answer the root of the question, but at least gives some insight into your example.

Cheers!

- Seppo #22


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